Wearable technology: the next big thing  

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, wearable technology like this is going to be the next thing to take the world by storm. This video is evidence enough that if the actual “technology” layer of the device doesn’t get in the way of living life, and is actually natural enough to integrate into every day movements then it is killer.

It may take half a decade for it to catch on, but I expect this kind of innovation to become both socially acceptable and the norm within the next decade. Sure, it might look goofy to have us all talking to ourselves, but it’s also incredibly useful and transparent to the user.

We’re also not specifically talking about Google Glass here. I expect a wave of innovations from smart watches to electronic clothing to become “mainstream” at some point in the foreseeable future.

As with self-driving cars, there will be a period where the market will probably reject it saying that it will “never” happen, but it will. It’s obvious that our lives could be somewhat enhanced by peripheral devices that show us information without needing to pull a slab out of our pockets to catch up.

These innovations are likely to feature minimal interfaces and beautiful natural user interaction to make them stick. The key to their success is making them so simple to use that they’re instantly integrated into the consumers' life.

All of this, though has some pretty interesting ramifications. Always-on cameras on everyone’s faces are a bit concerning. The Hacker News thread for Google Glass has some amazing discussion, and I was reminded of this video of a futuristic world where technology not dissimilar to this exists. It’s somewhat haunting, but the positive opportunities are also endless. Imagine broadcasting your wedding, live to your friends from your perspective. Special, indeed.

 
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